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Curriculum and Instruction News

Apple gives keynote at Re-Imagining Education for Democracy Summit in Australia

November 20, 2017
UW-Madison’s Michael W. Apple delivered the keynote address at the Re-Imagining Education for Democracy Summit in Queensland, Australia, on Nov. 13.

Michael Apple
Apple
Apple’s address was titled, “Can Education Change Society?” Apple writes that while it is important to offer analyses and critiques of the way the terrain of educational reform has been dominated by neoliberal and neoconservative policies, it is equally important to build critically democratic alternatives.

"Many people have argued that schools are simply reflections of the needs of economically dominant groups and thus nothing can actually be done that interrupts dominance.  We need to not simply dismiss these positions.  But they are too reductive," Apple ​writes.

Apple is the John Bascom Professor Emeritus of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies.
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