UW-Madison - Department of Curriculum and Instruction - News

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CONTACTING US

Main Office

Curriculum & Instruction
School of Education
UW-Madison
210 Teacher Education Building
225 North Mills Street
MadisonWI  53706

Tel: 608/263.4600
Fax: 608/263.9992

Email: curric@education.wisc.edu
or by contact form
 

Curriculum and Instruction News

Tue
Feb
13
The Discussion Project is a new professional development initiative created at the UW–Madison School of Education to help instructors both facilitate high-quality classroom discussions and prepare their students to participate in them. “Discussion-rich classrooms are valuable because students hear multiple perspectives and learn how to engage civilly with those holding opposing views, and that’s an important skill in a democracy,” says School of Education Dean Diana Hess.
Tue
Feb
13
Grand Challenges teams will showcase their Transform proposals submitted for funding on Wednesday, Feb. 28 from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Attendees to the poster fair can come speak with Grand Challenges teams about their proposals, see posters created by ​students from the School of Education's Art Department and have a complimentary lunch. The School of Education's Grand Challenges initiative aims to connect the School of Education with community partners to "identity and address critical problems in education, health and the arts."
Tue
Feb
06
At the "Arts Agôn: February Arts Research Forum," arts researchers will share their work with each other and UW-Madison campus colleagues. The Feb. 15 forum aims to create connections and encourage dialogue. The event will feature a Community Arts Collaboratory presentation with Erica Halverson, Kate Corby, Faisal Abdu’Allah and Stephanie Richards. These faculty and staff are partnering in the Arts Collaboratory to develop evaluation tools that can measure and ​demonstrate the impact of their various arts-based education programs.
Tue
Jan
30
UW-Madison began revitalizing the summer experience in 2016 with a significant increase in scholarship funding. The goal was to encourage more students to take advantage of accelerated summer courses so they could graduate on time and avoid the expense of extra semesters. Building on these successes in 2018, UW–Madison will serve a wider range of students during the summer months. Current undergraduates, incoming freshmen, students visiting from other institutions, high school students, and others will benefit from the university’s world-class resources.
Wed
Jan
24
UW-Madison alumna Crystle Martin was recently named the director of Library and Learning Resources at El Camino College. Martin earned a Ph.D. from the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 2012. El Camino College is located in Torrance, Calif.
Mon
Jan
22
UW-Madison's Beth Graue and Erica Ramberg reviewed and responded to a report about the advantages of online degree programs titled, “When Degree Programs for Pre-K Teachers Go Online: Challenges and Opportunities.” The report, written by Shayna Cook and published by the New America Foundation, argues that appropriately structured online degree programs have the potential to professionalize and increase the quality of early childhood (EC) teachers. Graue and Ramberg assert the report underplays a number of critical issues in professionalizing the field.
Fri
Jan
19
UW-Madison's Diana Hess authored a commentary for Education Week that is headlined, "The Problem With Calling Scholars 'Too Political.' " Hess is dean of the School of Education and the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. In the column, Hess writes about the importance of education scholars speaking up and participating in public debates about their issues of expertise. She frames partaking in political debate as a responsibility and a way to give back to the community and the universities that support them.
Mon
Jan
08
Erica Halverson, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, will be receiving a 2018 Postdoc Mentoring Award from UW-Madison’s Postdoctoral Association. This award honors outstanding mentors across campus and the work they put into students’ daily research lives and career development.
Fri
Jan
05
UW-Madison alumnus Sergio Gonzalez is the author of a recently released book titled, “Mexicans in Wisconsin.” Gonzalez received his undergraduate degree from the School of Education and teaching certification in secondary history education in 2010. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel recently put the spotlight on the book, noting how it tells a story of “perseverance and struggle, family and faith, stretched across more than 130 years.”
Tue
Jan
02
UW-Madison alumna Emily Schroeder, a dual language teacher at Madison's Lincoln Elementary, and Bill Quackenbush, the Ho-Chunk Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, played leading roles in pulling together and publishing a new trilingual children's book titled, "The Ho-Chunk Courting Flute." The book is told in English, Spanish and Ho-Chunk, and has three QR codes that one can scan and that allows a person to listen to Native speakers read the story in all three languages. A book release party is being held Jan. 5.
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